Hook an air pump to a soda bottle and copy this super cool experiment

Reusing old soda bottles is a great way to reduce waste while learning something new. Each project features a 2-liter container used in a myriad of different ways. From learning about the weather to creating an ecosystem, you'll be surprised at how many fun things you can do with such a simple too.
So clean out those bottles and get ready to put your soda habit to good use. Keep reading to learn more.
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1. Cloud in a bottle
This quick experiment speeds of cloud formation so you can watch it happen almost instantaneously. When the alcohol begins to evaporate, it acts as a dust particle. When the pressure is added and then released from the bottle, the water molecules (which are already in the air) quickly condenses creating a cloud.
2. Floating rice bottle (h/t Housing a Forest)
You can learn about the effect of friction and density with a little rice and some pencils. The pressure of the fluffed up rice adds stress to the pencil and holds it in place so that you can easily pick up the bottle just hanging up to your writing utensil.
3. Waterbottle ecosystem (h/t Scribbit)
This neat project results in a fully-functional, self-sustaining ecosystem. This is a slightly more complicated project, but the chance to watch the ecosystem grow and work over several weeks is well worth the effort. The sunlight and water work together to ensure enough that the system functions properly.
4. Bottle Tornado
This classic science experiment illustrates that even though a bottle may appear empty, it contains something: air. And when you create a vortex, the vortex disrupts the air creating a mini-tornado and allowing the water to move from one bottle to the next.
5. Bottle rocket
Check out Newton's Third Law of Motion (for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction) in ... motion. The air pressure pumped into the bottle pushes down on the water inside. When the pressure becomes too strong, the cork pushes out while the bottle pushes in the opposite direction, launching your rocket sky high.
6. Build a rain gauge (h/t Nurture Store)
A rain gauge is a fun way to keep tabs on how much moisture you receive during a rainfall. You can also have kids check the amount of water in the container against the weather forecast.
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