How to crochet the block stitch (video tutorial and written directions)

You'll love the way the block stitch builds up so fast, you'll have a blanket before you know it. For a visual explanation, this clear tutorial from Hopeful Honey explains the basic techniques for this stitch, which can also be known as the Chocolate Box, or plain Box Stitch. If you prefer written instructions instead of a video, see the written pattern below the video.
The stitch is beginner friendly and, despite being ideal for blankets, it's much more versatile than that. Check how to crochet the block stitch on the video below.
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How to crochet the block stitch video tutorial:
Block stitch written instructions:
As you'll have seen from the video, you need to chain in multiples of three to start off your block stitch, adding one extra chain at the end. Then, for row one, turn your work and crochet one single crochet in the second chain from your hook, and another single crochet in the next chain along. Then chain two. Now skip two chain stitches from the foundation row and single crochet into the next chain stitch. Then chain two, and then put a single crochet into the next chain. Then chain two again, and continue the pattern of one single crochet, two chains, until you come to the last stitch. Put a single crochet into the last chain of the row. Turn your work and chain two.
For row two, double crochet into the base of that chain two, your turning chain. After that, you will simply put three double crochets into every two chain space from the row below. Finish the row by putting one double crochet into the last stitch.
For row three, chain one. You may well want to change yarn color for this row, so either finish off the previous yarn with a tail of an inch and a half, and join the new yarn with a slipknot, or yarn over with the new yarn and stitch it in to anchor. Then put one single crochet into the chain one. Next, you'll single crochet into the space between the double crochet groups on the previous row. Then chain two, and single crochet in the space between the next two groups of double crochets. You'll finish the row off with a single crochet into the last stitch, and you may well want to change yarn colors again at this point, either going back to your original shade or joining a contrasting color.
The next row is row four, which you'll start off by chaining two and turning. Double crochet into the base of the chain two. Then it's three double crochets in the two chain space from the previous row. And that's about as complicated as it gets!
What can you make with the block stitch?
Once you've got the hang of the stitch, there will be no stopping you. The block stitch can be gloriously vivid, as shown in the example from The 8th Gem above, or it can make a deliciously soft, pastel baby blanket that's so snuggly, like the example from CrochetKnitting4U.
You can also add it into the mix with other stitches, as in this really beautiful blanket from Poppy and Bliss:
And it's not just blankets and squares - you can use the block stitch in almost anything, from scarves and booties to this fabulous pouffe, crocheted in the round:
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