How to knit the teardrop stitch (video tutorial & written pattern)

This stitch is lovely when used for a blanket or baby sweater but also makes for a nice detail when used more sparingly. Great for the intermediate knitter who is looking for a pattern to hold their interest, the tear drop stitch pattern involves a combination of knitting stitches and techniques to create an elegant result.
Though it would appear, at first glance, that the base of the teardrop stitch is created with a yarn over, the entire pattern is made using only strategically chosen increases and decreases. The faux yarn over is made by making 5 stitches out of 1 stitch, which opens the original stitch up to create both the “hole” you see as well as the broad base of the teardrop shape. Right- and left-leaning decreases stand out clearly against a background of reverse stockinette, framing the rest of the shape.
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The teardrop pattern is worked over a multiple of 4 stitches, plus one, across 13 rows. Because the pattern is offset each row, 13 rows will yield one complete and one half tear drop shape.
How to knit the teardrop stitch
Abbreviations
CO - Cast on
k - knit
p - purl
ssk - slip, slip, knit*
sl 1 - slip one stitch knitwise onto the right needle
k2tog - knit two stitches together
psso - pass the slipped stitch over the knit-together stitches and drop it off the needle (right-leaning single decrease)
Teardrop written pattern
CO 21 stitches (or any multiple of 4 stitches plus 1)
Row 1 - Right side: P1, * (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1) in next stitch, p3; repeat from * to end.
Row 2: * K3, p5; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Row 3: P1, * k5, p3; repeat from * to end.
Row 4: * K3, p5; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Row 5: P1, * ssk, k1, k2tog, p3; repeat from * to end.
Row 6: * K3, p3; repeat from * to last st, k1.
Row 7: P1, * sl 1, k2tog, psso, p1, (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1) in next stitch, p1; repeat from * to end.
Row 8: K1, * p5, k3; repeat from * to end.
Row 9: * P3, k5; repeat from * to last st, p1.
Row 10: K1, * p5, k3; repeat from * to end.
Row 11: * P3, ssk, k1, k2tog; repeat from * to last st, p1.
Row 12: K1, * p3, k3; repeat from * to end.
Row 13: P1, * (k1, p1, k1, p1, k1) in next stitch, p1, sl 1, k2tog, psso, p1; repeat from * to end.
Repeat rows 2 - 13.
It is always recommended to bind off the teardrop pattern on Row 7 or Row 13, omitting the increases from those rows as you bind off your stitches.
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Check out this great video tutorial from the folks at Knitting Stitch Patterns:

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