How to make a monogram wood letter with photos

Are you tired of the same rectangular frames being the only options at craft stores and department stores? This project is all about customizing the look of mounted photographs. Using photo-editing software, you can modify color saturation for an even more unusual look.
This craft would work beautifully for a nursery as well as for the future dorm room of a young adult entering college. But you don't have to be altruistic; feel free to make as many of these as you want for yourself!
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Materials
- Large wood letter
- Computer-printed photographs large enough to span the width of each leg of the letter
- Scissors
- Mod Podge
- Artist’s brush
- Decorative twine
- Hot-glue gun
- Hot glue
- Removable double-sided mounting tape or foam
DIY Everywhere
Instructions
1. Cut out enough desired photographs to cover the wood letter.
2. Apply Mod Podge to the front of the letter where you want the first picture to go.
3. Continue to apply adhesive and photos along the letter until it is covered.
4. Trim the excess paper around the letter’s edges, leaving just enough to Mod Podge to the letter’s sides.
5. Apply Mod Podge to the sides of the letter, place the letter facedown and fold the remaining bit of paper toward the back of the letter.
6. Apply Mod Podge to the face of the letter, over the photos. Let it dry completely.
7. Put hot glue around the edges of the letter a little at a time, applying the twine as you go.
8. Trim off excess twine.
9. After the glue is dry, use mounting tape or foam to adhere the finished product to a wall or door.
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Resources

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