Put vinyl records on full display at home with a record stand made from a pallet

There’s something charming and nostalgic about vinyl records when it comes to music collections. Between their simple, old-fashioned appeal and the decorative artwork on the album covers, it’s easy to see why many music enthusiasts view records as the ultimate testament to authentic listening. Whether it’s a budding collection or an extensive one that’s been built over time, half the fun in having a record collection is putting it on display. Some creative inspiration and the right tools are all it takes to turn a wooden pallet into an eye-catching record stand for exhibiting a collection at home.
A few pallet boards ⁠— well-cut, sanded and stained ⁠— quickly transform into record stand ends that are both unique and functional. Combine these ends with angled baseboards, and in no time at all, your records will be visible and ready to be admired and browsed. This pallet-based record stand works well in a music room but could just as easily transition into the living room as an end table accent. Enjoy sharing your collection with friends and using this record stand as a conversation starter when guests are over.
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Materials
- Wood pallet
- Table saw
- Tape measure
- Wood glue
- Vice (2)
- Orbital sander
- Loop sanding disc, 8-hole P80 grit
- Loop sanding disc, 8-hole P220 grit
- Fast dry wood stain
- Pencil
- T-square
- Home Decor Chalk in Parisian Gray
- Record collection
DIY Everywhere
Instructions
1. Cut six boards from a wooden pallet measuring 9 1/2 inches long by 5 inches wide using a table saw.
2. Apply a line of wood glue to one long edge of three boards. Allow the glue to sit for 5 minutes before pressing the edges together to connect the boards. Make sure the short edges of each of the boards is lined up with the others. Repeat this with three additional boards so there are two sets of pallet boards for the final product.
3. Tighten a vice on either side of each of the three board sets, and allow the glue to dry for 24 hours.
4. Remove the vice and sand all surfaces of the boards using an orbital sander and an 8-hole P80 grit loop disc.
5. Remove the P80 grit loop disc when sanding is complete and replace it with a P220 grit loop disc. Sand each of the surfaces once again.
6. Apply fast-drying wood stain to each set of three boards and allow them to dry completely.
7. Cut two pieces of wood from the pallet measuring 12 inches long by 2 inches wide.
8. Measure 2 inches in from the left short end of one of the pieces of wood using a T-square and pencil to mark measurements.
9. Measure and mark an additional half-inch out from the 2-inch mark and draw a diagonal line from each of the markings to the top edge of the wood. Repeat this on the right edge of the wood and on both sides of the second piece of wood as well.
10. Saw away the diagonal cutouts from each of the two pieces of wood. This will create two record stand bases with two diagonal cutouts each.
11. Paint each of the base pieces of wood with Home Decor Chalk in Parisian Gray. Allow the bases to dry.
12. Position the baseboards on a flat surface approximately 10 inches apart with the angled cutouts facing up.
13. Place a wood-stained pallet board into the two end baseboards so they are angled away from each other on either end. The bottom of the boards will rest flush against the angled cutouts.
14. Fill the space between the pallet boards with records to easily display, browse and admire at home!
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