Upcycle an old drawer into storage for your precious mementos

Looking for creative ways to display your favorite treasures? This cabinet made from an old drawer is a unique take on decorative shelving. The door helps protect your priceless mementos, whether they’re precious figurines or seashells from a beach vacation. The cabinet not only draws the eye to what’s inside but also prevents any awkward mishaps from an errant elbow or an overeager guest.
Lovers of eclectic style will adore this decorative cabinet. Rustic details like poultry netting and sage green paint complement any room adorned with folksy decor. A vintage drawer sourced from an antique shop, garage sale or estate sale adds to the shabby chic appeal. The only things that are missing are your tchotchkes and souvenirs!
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Materials
- Small drawer
- T-square
- Strip board, 1-by-2 inches
- Handsaw or jigsaw (not pictured)
- Pencil
- Wood glue
- Sanding sponge
- Folk Art Home Decor Chalk Paint in “Sage”
- Paintbrush
- Poultry netting
- Wire cutters
- Protective gloves
- Manual staple gun
- Small butt hinge, 2
- Small screws, 8
- Electric drill
- Phillips-head bit
- Gorilla Super Glue Gel
- Small magnets, 4
DIY Everywhere
Instructions
1. Measure the length of the drawer, and add 1 inch. This is the length you should cut two pieces of wood from the strip board. For example, if your drawer is 9 inches long, you’ll want to cut two pieces of wood that are each 10 inches long.
2. Repeat step 1 but for the width of the drawer. For example, if your drawer is 6 ½ inches wide, you’ll want to cut two pieces of wood that are each 7 ½ inches long.
3. Arrange the cut pieces to form a rectangle, with the short pieces lying horizontally on top of the long pieces. This is the beginning of the cabinet door.
4. Each corner of the door needs a miter joint to connect the pieces together. The end result is a door that looks like a picture frame. To make a miter joint, start by drawing a line on the long pieces where the short pieces overlap. Remove the short pieces. You should now have a 1-by-1-inch square at each end of the long pieces. With the T-square, draw a diagonal line connecting the opposite corners of the squares, starting from the outside corners of the outside edge and going toward the inside corners of the inside edge.
5. Repeat with the short pieces. Lay the corresponding long piece on top of the ends of each short piece, then mark the width of the long piece onto the short piece. You should now have a 1-by-1-inch square at each end of the short pieces. With the T-square, draw a diagonal line connecting the opposite corners of the squares, starting from the outside corners of the outside edge and going toward the inside corners of the inside edge.
6. Cut along the diagonal line on each piece. Discard the excess wood. The sides of your cabinet door should now fit flush together. Glue the corners together with wood glue. Allow the glue to dry.
7. Sand the doorframe. Paint the frame with “Sage” chalk paint. Allow it to dry.
8. While wearing protective gloves, cut a piece of poultry netting to fit the back of the doorframe. Staple the netting to the back of the frame with a manual staple gun.
9. Paint the inside of the drawer with “Sage” chalk paint. Allow it to dry.
10. Center the door on top of the drawer. Turn upside down.
11. Position the butt hinges on the side of the drawer and the back of the door. Mark where the screws should go. Drill small guide holes into the door using one of the small screws as a bit. Screw the hinge in place, first by attaching it to the door, then to the drawer. Repeat with the second hinge.
12. Turn the cabinet right-side up. Open the door. With super glue, glue two pairs of small magnets to the middle of the long edge of the drawer opposite from the hinged side. If there’s a cutout in the drawer as there is with the one in this project, glue a pair of magnets above and below the cutout.
13. Put a drop of super glue on top of the exposed magnets. Close the door. Allow the glue to dry.
14. Your new cabinet is complete and ready to hang on the wall.
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